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3 Rules I Use To Keep Pets Safe In The Desert

Posted by in Family, Life Hacks, News, Pets, Pixel

Anyone who really knows me, knows I have three chihuahuas. Mango, Mojo, and Pixel.

I also have three boys, each celebrated coincidentally with a chihuahua.

My first dog was a mini dachshund, Pip. -Total bitch, but she was smart and awesome! She cured our family of bickering in no time when she was still a puppy.

…Which kind of brings me to my point. Pip was 11 years old when she mysteriously disappeared while barking outside, yet still inside my parents courtyard… All that remained of Pip was a little bit of blood on the ground.

We are left to assume it was either a bobcat, coyote, mountain lion, eagle, or some other bird of prey.

It was a harsh lesson for us all. Pip was small. 11 pounds of hot dog sausage fury. Delicious sounding to the average predator, I’m sure.

She died 10 years ago this year and now that I have three kids and three dogs, I am continuing to improve upon my proactive approach of keeping my loved ones safe.

How to keep your beloved pets and things safe in the desert according to Holly:

Rule #1: Never leave your pets alone outside. Just don’t risk it. Sure a pack of giant breed dogs are pretty safe, but even a large dog can become a victim in the wrong situation. …Coyotes run in packs, mountain lions are amazingly strong and fierce (especially when hangry), owls are clever, snakes are sneaky, dare I go on..?

Rule#2: Minimize the reasons an animal might be interested in being near your property. Consider if you’re inadvertently inviting predators by leaving pet or human food outside, or not picking/cleaning up enough after outdoor feasts. I say again: Minimize danger.

-Forethought. Learn it. Live it. Love it!

Is it dark? Use man made lights to your advantage. It blinds or discourages sneak attacks because the lights are too bright in contrast to the natural darkness the wildlife is used to.

Rule #3 Don’t get too comfortable. I mean, predators are obviously good at observing their surroundings and checking for holes in the fence, animals alone, distractions, or learned responses. …Say if every time a door creeks there’s a little doggy that goes outside with a clanky metal collar, does it’s smelly business, barks, draws attention… Predators are smart and resourceful. They will pick up on habitual behavior and look for an opportunity- a weakness.

It may be best to have fencing that is tall, but that will not guarantee any real safety. It adds a level of security, but flying animals won’t even think about a wall or fence and I’ve seen mountain lions and bobcats on the roof, so a 6 foot stucco wall won’t do enough to keep them out.

All the tips and prep in the world aren’t as good as your undivided attention for keeping your pets safe.

Stay alert and your pets are more likely to stay alive!

Have a desert animal story?

Tell me about it in the comments!

Why Jim Carrey is an Inspiration

Posted by in Inspiration

I recently watched this great video about Jim Carrey and his spirituality, which reminded me that one of my favorite movies of all time is “Ace Ventura”, both of them. It has affected me. I love being silly. I have mucho appreciation for Mr. Carrey! I always thought that If I ever made a movie it would be named Grace Ventura. Al-ri-high-ty-then! Just kidding 😉

Instead of aspiring to become a rich and famous comedian/actress and having a way to take care of all my own wants and needs, I became an animal whisperer-like person whose parents moved all over America with the Forest Service. This made it so that I ended up connecting pretty well with all of the family pets. At the age of 8, I got my very own pet, which was a miniature dachshund named Princess Pip Squeak. For the record, I did not like this name, but my parent’s got her for me for my birthday, so my dad got the last word on that one. He even registered her as an AKC with that name. We called her Pip, she was the cutest doxie you’d ever seen and actually grew up to be quite bitchy. Excuse the language, but I mean that in both meanings of the word. She was my dog and as she grew out of puppy-dom, she knew my parents were the alpha’s in our house so she only listened to them. I tried every trick in the book at 8 to teach her to respect me, but I failed miserably.

We were more like siblings than an alpha and omega. She was sure she was the Alpha, ppff, growled at me and we’d bicker with each other all the time, but I begrudgingly walked her, fed her, watered her, kept her as my pet and she slept with me every night for another eight years (hence why she thought I was her slave…). I can’t let you think she was a bad dog, because she had her amazing moments. My family used to be quite the bickerers and she cured that. Every time we fought she would squeak, squeal, and bark until we stopped. It seemed to work.  I only realized a few years back what a lesson Pip was for me and that’s a topic for a different post. I finally earned her respect after I had my first child at 21 which ended up feeling quite comical when I brought my first baby boy home and she was sooo sweet to me.

Since “Ace Ventura”, I’ve really appreciated some of Jim’s other movies, like “Bruce Almighty” and “Yes! Man”. You can watch the video below.

Thanks for checking in,

-Holly





To learn more about Jim Carrey on Wikipedia Here.

 Thank you The Journey of Purpose for that one.




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